Free Online Healthcare Courses

Healthcare is a huge - and growing - career field. It's also something that touches everyone's lives at one point or another. Learning about an area of the healthcare field from these online courses could lead to a lucrative career, or set your mind at ease about your own concerns. If you're already enrolled in a healthcare course, these courses could be a good way to broaden your studies, or to revise key areas.

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A Clinical Approach to the Human Brain - MIT

This course is designed to provide an understanding of how the human brain works in health and disease, and is intended for both the Brain and Cognitive Sciences major and the non-Brain and Cognitive Sciences major. Knowledge of how the human brain works is important for all citizens, and the lessons to be learned have enormous implications for public policy makers and educators. The course will cover the regional anatomy of the brain and provide an introduction to the cellular function of neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters. Commonly used drugs that alter brain function can be understood through a knowledge of neurotransmitters. Along similar lines, common diseases that illustrate normal brain function will be discussed.

Acoustics of Speech and Hearing - MIT

The Acoustics of Speech and Hearing is an H-Level graduate course that reviews the physical processes involved in the production, propagation and reception of human speech. Particular attention is paid to how the acoustics and mechanics of the speech and auditory system define what sounds we are capable of producing and what sounds we can sense. Areas of discussion include: 1. the acoustic cues used in determining the direction of a sound source, 2. the acoustic and mechanical mechanisms involved in speech production and 3.the acoustic and mechanical mechanism used to transduce and analyze sounds in the ear.

Adolescent Health and Development - Johns Hopkins

The course consists of lectures, readings, discussions, panels of guest speakers, group and individual projects. The purpose of the lectures, readings, discussion and panels of guest speakers is to explore a variety of aspects of adolescence and adolescent health. The group and individual projects are meant to help students develop skills to work in multi-disciplinary teams and analyze adolescent health concerns through conceptual frameworks and recommend effective solutions through interventions.

Ageing and disability: transitions into residential care - The Open University

Moving into a care home can have a profound emotional impact on an individual – just the anticipation of residential care is one of the biggest sources of fear for the elderly. This unit discusses the role of social workers and care staff in supporting individuals through the transition, and how residential environments affect quality of life.

Alcohol and human health - The Open University

What impact does alcohol have on the body? From a 'hangover' to cirrhosis this unit looks at the harmful effects of alcohol both in the short and long term.

Basic Human Pathology: Parts I and II - Tufts University

Basic Human Pathology (BHP) is divided into two parts. Part I, general pathology, refers to the study of basic pathology processes that underlie all disease such as cellular pathology, inflammation and repair, fluid and hemodynamic derangements, neoplasias, and the study of genetic immunologic, metabolic and deficiency, infections, environmental, pediatric and geriatric diseases. Part II, systems pathology, refers to the study of diseases affecting specific organs and their systems such as cardiovasuclar; respiratory; ear, nose, throat; ophthalmic; alimentary tract including oral cavity; lymphoid and hemopoietic tissues; liver; pancreas and biliary tract; endocrine; urinary; male and female genital; nervous system; musculoskeletal; and integument.

Becoming a critical social work practitioner - The Open University

What does it take to become a critical practitioner in social work? This unit will guide you through some important concepts. An understanding of 'critical perspectives' will help you take a positive and constructive approach to problems that arise in social work practice.

Bedfordshire Mencap - The Open University

This unit enables you to hear some of the founding members of the Bedfordshire Mencap organisation talk about how the organisation was established and the wide range of support services it offers. The work that individuals exerted to promote change is a source of pressure towards the ideal that parents should be supported in their task of bringing up children with learning difficulties.

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Solutions Using R and Bioconductor - Johns Hopkins

Covers the basics of R software and the key capabilities of the Bioconductor project (a widely used open source and open development software project for the analysis and comprehension of data arising from high-throughput experimentation in genomics and molecular biology and rooted in the open source statistical computing environment R), including importation and preprocessing of high-throughput data from microarrays and other platforms.

Biologic Agents of Water and Foodborne Bioterrorism - Johns Hopkins

This presentation examines the various biological agents that terrorists could use against food or water supplies.This presentation's content is part of a non-credit, professional development training generated by JHSPH faculty and the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness.The OCW version of this presentation comprises slides only. A full version, including synchronized audio is available at no charge by visiting the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness (registration required).

Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions - MIT

This course covers the principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Tissue and organ regeneration. Design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions.

Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series: Developing Professional Skills - MIT

This course consists of a series of seminars focused on the development of professional skills. Each semester focuses on a different topic, resulting in a repeating cycle that covers medical ethics, responsible conduct of research, written and oral technical communication, and translational issues. Material and activities include guest lectures, case studies, interactive small group discussions, and role-playing simulations.

Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series: Topics in Medical Ethics and Responsible Conduct in Research - MIT

This seminar based course explores techniques for recognizing, analyzing, and resolving ethical dilemmas facing healthcare professionals and biomedical researchers in today's highly regulated environment. Guest lectures by practicing clinicians, technologists, researchers, and regulators will include case studies, interactive small group discussions, and role-playing simulations. Professional conduct topics will include authorship, conflict of interest, data acquisition and management, and the protection of human subjects and animals involved in research programs.

Biomedical Signal and Image Processing - MIT

This course presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing with particular emphasis on problems in biomedical research and clinical medicine. It covers principles and algorithms for processing both deterministic and random signals. Topics include data acquisition, imaging, filtering, coding, feature extraction, and modeling. The focus of the course is a series of labs that provide practical experience in processing physiological data, with examples from cardiology, speech processing, and medical imaging. The labs are done in MATLAB® during weekly lab sessions that take place in an electronic classroom. Lectures cover signal processing topics relevant to the lab exercises, as well as background on the biological signals processed in the labs.

Biostatistics for Medical Product Regulation - Johns Hopkins

Provides a broad understanding of the application of biostatistics in a regulatory context. Reviews the relevant regulations and guidance documents. Includes topics such as basic study design, target population, comparison groups, and endpoints. Addresses analysis issues with emphasis on the regulatory aspects, including issues of missing data and informative censoring. Discusses safety monitoring, interim analysis and early termination of trials with a focus on regulatory implications.

Biostatistics Lecture Series - Johns Hopkins

The day-to-day collaboration between the researchers in Public Health and Biostatistics at the School reveals unified topics that cut across many applications. This series of presentations: 1. introduces the topics that show empirically to be most important in these collaborations; and 2. emphasizes concepts over details, through recent applications in Public Health.

Brain Mechanisms for Hearing and Speech - MIT

An advanced course covering anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and computational studies of the central nervous system relevant to speech and hearing. Students learn primarily by discussions of scientific papers on topics of current interest. Recent topics include cell types and neural circuits in the auditory brainstem, organization and processing in the auditory cortex, auditory reflexes and descending systems, functional imaging of the human auditory system, quantitative methods for relating neural responses to behavior, speech motor control, cortical representation of language, and auditory learning in songbirds.

Cardiovascular Pathiophysiology - Tufts University

In the second year Introduction to Cardiovascular Pathophysiology course, students will be introduced to the pathophysiologic basis for common cardiovascular diseases. This includes the basics of hemodynamic perturbations and congenital and arrhythmic disorders of the heart. Students are also introduced to the spectrum of coronary disease and cardiomyopathies as well as the basics of vascular diseases. By the end of the course, students are familiar with common cardiovascular entities. The course will allow them to embark on a broader future understanding of the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular diseases.

Care relationships - The Open University

To set up a care relationship that works well is a delicate matter, whether you are at the giving or the receiving end. In this unit we explore the very varied meanings of care relationships and how these meanings arise. Millions of care relationships are going on as you read this, and each carries its own particular meanings for those involved. But where have all those people picked up their ideas of how to relate to each other? How does any of us know where to begin?

Caring: A Family Affair - The Open University

Care is needed at all stages of life. This unit makes care in the family its focus because the overwhelming majority of care, including health care, is supplied in families, much of it in private, much of it unnoticed and unremarked upon. The meaning of the term (informal carer) and the word (care) itself are explored.

Caring in hospitals - The Open University

This unit considers the type of care offered in hospitals, using Leeds General Hospital as a case study. The unit looks at the people who have roles within the hospital, how they interact with each other and patients and what they consider to be 'care'. The different approaches and contributions to care by doctors and nurses are explored and patients give their perspective on the care they receive.

Case Studies in Terrorism Response - Johns Hopkins

The objective of this presentation is to use three illustrative case studies to reinforce basic concepts and principles of terrorism preparedness and response, as well as to identify some specific practical considerations. These case studies will illustrate: (1) Plausable scenarios, (2) Typical first response activities, (3) Critical issues on-the-fly, and (4) Considerations for planning.

Cellular and Molecular Immunology - MIT

This course covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation, including molecular structure and assembly of MHC molecules, the biology of cytokines, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated diseases. The course is structured as a series of lectures and tutorials in which clinical cases are discussed with faculty tutors.

Cell-Matrix Mechanics - MIT

Mechanical forces play a decisive role during development of tissues and organs, during remodeling following injury as well as in normal function. A stress field influences cell function primarily through deformation of the extracellular matrix to which cells are attached. Deformed cells express different biosynthetic activity relative to undeformed cells. The unit cell process paradigm combined with topics in connective tissue mechanics form the basis for discussions of several topics from cell biology, physiology, and medicine.

Challenging ideas in mental health - The Open University

Take a new and different look at mental health. This unit invites you to think differently about life's dilemmas by taking account of the views of all concerned, especially people experiencing mental distress. It explores ideas and practice in mental health, and will appeal to a wide range of people.

Children's participation - The Open University

Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child introduced the right of children to have a say in issues affecting them. Although historic accounts demonstrate some children's willingness and ability to express an opinion pre dating the UNCRC, a more visible emphasis on children's involvement and participation, particularly in the design and delivery of children's services, has been identified in its wake. Theory, practice guidelines and practitioner accounts are used to help the learner reflect on values and develop knowledge and skills for effective engagement and communication with groups of children in different contexts.

Computational Evolutionary Biology - MIT

Why has it been easier to develop a vaccine to eliminate polio than to control influenza or AIDS? Has there been natural selection for a 'language gene'? Why are there no animals with wheels? When does 'maximizing fitness' lead to evolutionary extinction? How are sex and parasites related? Why don't snakes eat grass? Why don't we have eyes in the back of our heads? How does modern genomics illustrate and challenge the field? This course analyzes evolution from a computational, modeling, and engineering perspective. The course has extensive hands-on laboratory exercises in model-building and analyzing evolutionary data.

Computing for Biomedical Scientists - MIT

This course introduces abstraction as an important mechanism for problem decomposition and solution formulation in the biomedical domain, and examines computer representation, storage, retrieval, and manipulation of biomedical data. As part of the course, we will briefly examine the effect of programming paradigm choice on problem-solving approaches, and introduce data structures and algorithms. We will also examine knowledge representation schemes for capturing biomedical domain complexity and principles of data modeling for efficient storage and retrieval. The final project involves building a medical information system that encompasses the different concepts taught in the course. Computer science basics covered in the first part of the course are integral to understanding topics covered in the latter part, and for completing the assigned homework.

Concepts in Economic Evaluation - Johns Hopkins

Describes how economic theory is linked to economic evaluation techniques like cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis and to introduce students to many concepts that are specific to economic evaluation. Introduces students to the many varieties of economic evaluation to establish a common terminology. Discusses cost-benefit with a demonstration of how this type of evaluation is most clearly linked to economic theory. Explores other theories and concepts, including cost measurement, benefit valuation, and incremental decision-making. Finally, explores recommendations on performing economic evaluations that are made in the United States with a focus on how these are related to underlying economic theory and other concepts.

Confronting the Burden of Injuries - Johns Hopkins

Confronting the Burden of Injuries- A Global Perspective is a course offered by the Department of International Health and the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University. This course is intended to guide students interested in working on injury control in areas with little to no tradition in injury prevention from a public health perspective. Students will learn to define the injury problem and assess its magnitude; identify data sources and assess the quality of the data; identify which agencies or institutions should be involved in the solution of the problem; identify which interventions are in place and need to be implemented and evaluated; produce a strategic plan for the establishment and/or improvement of injury prevention programs in such areas; and present such a plan to authorities in a compelling manner.

Critical Analysis of Popular Diets and Dietary Substances - Johns Hopkins

There is much controversy and anecdotal information about popular diets and dietary supplements, but all too often little scientific or controlled clinical data. We examine the science behind normal mechanisms of weight control, and how weight loss diets are constructed and work. The aim of the course is to acquire the knowledge to critically appraise a weight control diet or dietary supplement and choose the best plan for success, both in the short-term and the long run. Students taking the actual class will, in addition to learning the lecture material presented here, complete in-class assignments where they choose a popular diet or supplement, research the scientific literature on this diet/supplement, and present a critical appraisal of its validity and efficacy.

Culture, Politics, and Community: Living Public Health in Nigeria - Johns Hopkins

In this lecture, Professor Brieger discusses some of the lessons he learned during his 26-year experience working in Nigeria and his subsequent work with a wider variety of African nations, focusing on on tropical diseases and their associated social, cultural, and behavioral aspects.

Design of Medical Devices and Implants - MIT

This design course targets the solution of clinical problems by use of implants and other medical devices. Topics include the systematic use of cell-matrix control volumes; the role of stress analysis in the design process; anatomic fit, shape and size of implants; selection of biomaterials; instrumentation for surgical implantation procedures; preclinical testing for safety and efficacy, including risk/benefit ratio assessment evaluation of clinical performance and design of clinical trials. Student project materials are drawn from orthopedic devices, soft tissue implants, artificial organs, and dental implants.

Designing and Sustaining Technology Innovation for Global Health Practice - MIT

Innovation in global health practice requires leaders who are trained to think and act like entrepreneurs. Whether at a hospital bedside or in a remote village, global healthcare leaders must understand both the business of running a social venture as well as how to plan for and provide access to life saving medicines and essential health services. Each week, the course features a lecture and skills-based tutorial session led by industry, non-profit foundation, technology, and academic leaders to think outside the box in tackling and solving problems in innovation for global health practice through the rationale design of technology and service solutions. The lectures provide the foundation for faculty-mentored pilot project from MOH, students, or non-profit sponsors that may involve creation of a market or business plan, product development, or a research study design.

Dissertation Workshop - Johns Hopkins

The workshop is intended for Doctoral students in the health and social sciences who are at the stage of developing a research proposal. Participants will gain skills in the design of conceptually cogent and methodologically rigorous dissertation proposals. The Workshop has an emphasis on topics that relate to Africa, but can be applied to a broad range of research issues. This course was developed by JHSPH faculty with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Qualified educators may order this course and others on CD-ROM from the Bill and Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health.

Diversity and difference in communication - The Open University

Interpersonal communication in health and social care services is by its nature diverse. As a consequence, achieving good or effective communication – whether between service providers and service users, or among those working in a service – means taking account of diversity, rather than assuming that every interaction will be the same. This unit explores the ways in which difference and diversity impact on the nature of communication in health and social care services.

Environmental Health - Johns Hopkins

Examines health issues, scientific understanding of causes, and possible future approaches to control of the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Topics include how the body reacts to environmental pollutants; physical, chemical, and biological agents of environmental contamination; vectors for dissemination (air, water, soil); solid and hazardous waste; susceptible populations; biomarkers and risk analysis; the scientific basis for policy decisions; and emerging global environmental health problems.

Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases - Johns Hopkins

Introduces the basic methods for infectious disease epidemiology and case studies of important disease syndromes and entities. Methods include definitions and nomenclature, outbreak investigations, disease surveillance, case-control studies, cohort studies, laboratory diagnosis, molecular epidemiology, dynamics of transmission, and assessment of vaccine field effectiveness. Case-studies focus on acute respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, hepatitis, HIV, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, malaria, and other vector-borne diseases.

Epidemiology and Biostatistics - Tufts University

The primary purpose of this course is to teach you basic skills to critique the medical literature. As future physicians you have an obligation to remain current in your field of practice and to treat patients according to generally accepted standards of care. To do this well you will need to read those journals that are considered the most important sources of new information impacting on your field of medicine.

Essentials of Probability and Statistical Inference IV: Algorithmic and Nonparametic Approaches - Johns Hopkins

Introduces the theory and application of modern, computationally-based methods for exploring and drawing inferences from data. Covers re-sampling methods, non-parametric regression, prediction, and dimension reduction and clustering. Specific topics include Monte Carlo simulation, bootstrap cross-validation, splines, local weighted regression, CART, random forests, neural networks, support vector machines, and hierarchical clustering. De-emphasizes proofs and replaces them with extended discussion of interpretation of results and simulation and data analysis for illustration.

Ethical Issues in Public Health - Johns Hopkins

Lectures and small group discussions focus on ethical theory and current ethical issues in public health and health policy, including resource allocation, the use of summary measures of health, the right to health care, and conflicts between autonomy and health promotion efforts. Student evaluation based on class participation, a group project, and a paper evaluating ethical issues in the student's area of public health specialization.

Ethics of Human Subject Research - Johns Hopkins

Ethics of Human Subject Research (2 credits) is offered by the Department of Health Policy and Management and the Distance Education Division, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and The Phoebe R. Berman Bioethics Institute, Johns Hopkins University. The course introduces students to the ethics of human subject research. Ethical theory and principles are introduced, followed by a brief history of research ethics. Topics covered in lectures and moderated discussions include informed consent for research participation, role and function of institutional review boards, just selection of research subjects, ethical aspects of study design, and privacy and confidentiality.

Evaluating Therapies in Observational Studies: HAART to Heart Lessons from HIV/AIDS - Johns Hopkins

This lecture addresses the evaluation challenges posed by observational studies, paying particular attention to the cardiovascular implications raised by recent HAART research.

Experiences of Assessment - The Open University

This unit is about assessing need. It is important to understand and hear about people's experiences of being assessed by health or social welfare professionals so that more sensitive responses to those with care and support needs can be developed. We interviewed three people about their experiences of assessment. Having done that, we then asked a social worker and an occupational therapist to listen to the interviews and to comment on them.

Exploring Children's Learning - The Open University

How can you analyse children and their development? This unit allows the learner to analyse how children's cognitive shills develop over time. You will also learn about how various different investigative methods have developed over time and how different techniques can produce different results.

Family Planning Policies and Programs - Johns Hopkins

Introduces issues and programmatic strategies related to the development, organization, and management of family planning programs, especially those in developing countries. Topics include social, economic, health, and human rights rationale for family planning; identifying and measuring populations in need of family planning services; social, cultural, political, and ethical barriers; contraceptive methods and their programmatic requirements; strategic alternatives, including integrated and vertical programs and public and private sector services; information, education, and communication strategies; management information systems; and the use of computer models for program design.

Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems - MIT

This course covers the following topics: conduction, diffusion, convection in electrolytes; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor and electrical forces in physiological systems; and fluid and solid continua: equations of motion useful for porous, hydrated biological tissues. Case studies considered include membrane transport; electrode interfaces; electrical, mechanical, and chemical transduction in tissues; electrophoretic and electroosmotic flows; diffusion/reaction; and ECG. The course also examines electromechanical and physicochemical interactions in biomaterials and cells; orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and other clinical examples.

Finding Information in Health and Lifestyle - The Open University

This unit will help you to identify and use information in health and lifestyle, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of organising your own information, and learn how to reference it properly in your work. Finally, discover how to keep up to date with the latest developments in your area of interest by using tools such as RSS and mailing lists.

Food and Nutrition Policy - Johns Hopkins

The purpose of this course is to familiarize and engage the student in the steps and dynamics of policy making processes that address nutrition problems and issues. An underlying tenant is that, where ever nutrition problems exist, policy and program options may be enacted to address the problem directly (e.g. food subsidies to the poor) and/or indirectly (e.g. income generation or job creation).

Food Production, Public Health, and the Environment - Johns Hopkins

This course provides an understanding of the complex and challenging public health issue of food security and in a world where one billion people are under-nourished while another billion are overweight. Explores the connections among diet, the current food and food animal production systems, the environment and public health, considering factors such as economics, population and equity. Case studies are used to examine these complex relationships and as well as alternative approaches to achieving both local and global food security and the important role public health can play. Guest lecturers include experts from a variety of disciplines and experiences.

Fuel Poverty in Scotland - The Open University

In this unit, you will be hearing and reading about the issues faced by people living in poverty in Britain in 2000. This is intended to give you an understanding of what poverty is like from the perspective of the people themselves, both in terms of the experience of living on a very low income, and some of the effects this has had on their lives. One of the biggest problems facing people living on a very low income is how to afford adequate heating.

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis - MIT

This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment.

Fundamentals of Epidemiology I - Johns Hopkins

Fundamentals of Epidemiology I is the first half of a course that introduces the basic concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics as applied to public health problems. Emphasis is placed on the principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation, appropriate summaries and displays of data, and the use of classical statistical approaches to describe the health of populations. Topics include the dynamic behavior of disease; usage of rates, ratios and proportions; methods of direct and indirect adjustment, and clinical life table which measures and describes the extent of disease problems.

Fundamentals of Oncology for Public Health Practitioners - Johns Hopkins

Lectures by current practitioners of cancer prevention control in clinical oncology cover the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention/screening measures used for cancers such as lung, breast, prostate, colon/rectal, etc.

Fundamentals of Clinical Trials - UC Irvine

Clinical trials are designed to answer questions concerning the safety and effectiveness of medical products. Get an overview of clinical trials regulated by the FDA. Learn about the planning process underlying the Strategic Clinical Plan and regulatory submissions to the FDA. Explore topics including protocol development and implementation, i.e. study site selection, financial controls, timelines, and management of the site's operations; proper informed consent; Good Clinical Practices compliance; HIPAA; FDA regulations and guidelines; and post-market support studies.

Fundamentals of Program Evaluation - Johns Hopkins

Fundamentals of Program Evaluation familiarizes students in different types of program evaluation, including needs assessment, formative research, process evaluation, monitoring of outputs and outcomes, impact assessment, and cost analysis. Students gain practical experience through a series of exercises involving the design of a conceptual framework, development of indicators, analysis of computerized service statistics, and development of an evaluation plan to measure impact. This course covers experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental study designs, including the strengths and limitations of each.

Funding elite sport - The Open University

Training and preparing to compete as an elite athlete can take significant financial support. Where does the money to support such athletes in the UK come from? This unit will examine the question of funding in UK elite sport.

Gastroenterology - MIT

The most recent knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, biophysics, and bioengineering of the gastrointestinal tract and the associated pancreatic, liver and biliary tract systems is presented and discussed. Gross and microscopic pathology and the clinical aspects of important gastroenterological diseases are then presented, with emphasis on integrating the molecular, cellular and pathophysiological aspects of the disease processes to their related symptoms and signs.

Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology - Tufts University

This course reviews the pathophysiology of common gastrointestinal conditions and assumes a general understanding of gastrointestinal physiology. The course follows an organ based structure to include disorders of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum, small intestines, pancreas, biliary system, and liver. The material is presented in the syllabus, lecture slides, and small group sessions. Self-assessment questions are provided at the end of each lecture and examinations are provided for review and self-testing.

Genomics and Computational Biology - MIT

This course will assess the relationships among sequence, structure, and function in complex biological networks as well as progress in realistic modeling of quantitative, comprehensive, functional genomics analyses. Exercises will include algorithmic, statistical, database, and simulation approaches and practical applications to medicine, biotechnology, drug discovery, and genetic engineering. Future opportunities and current limitations will be critically addressed. In addition to the regular lecture sessions, supplementary sections are scheduled to address issues related to Perl, Mathematica and biology.

Genomics, Computing, Economics, and Society - MIT

This course will focus on understanding aspects of modern technology displaying exponential growth curves and the impact on global quality of life through a weekly updated class project integrating knowledge and providing practical tools for political and business decision-making concerning new aspects of bioengineering, personalized medicine, genetically modified organisms, and stem cells. Interplays of economic, ethical, ecological, and biophysical modeling will be explored through multi-disciplinary teams of students, and individual brief reports.

Genomics Medicine - MIT

This course reviews the key genomic technologies and computational approaches that are driving advances in prognostics, diagnostics, and treatment. Throughout the semester, emphasis will return to issues surrounding the context of genomics in medicine including: what does a physician need to know? what sorts of questions will s/he likely encounter from patients? how should s/he respond? Lecturers will guide the student through real world patient-doctor interactions. Outcome considerations and socioeconomic implications of personalized medicine are also discussed.

Genetics - Tufts University

Medical genetics involves the application of genetic principles in the practice of medicine. Medical genetics encompasses diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases, study of inheritance of diseases in families, mapping of disease genes to their chromosome locations, study of the molecular genetics and pathogenesis of inherited disorders, provision of genetic counseling for families, and recently, investigations of methods for gene therapy. The field of Human Genetics has expanded exponentially over the past twenty-five years. Unlike any other field, genetics represents a true integration between the basic and the clinical sciences.

Geriatric Dentistry - Tufts University

The dentist is a key member of the health delivery team. This didactic course teaches the student how to render comprehensive oral health care and teach prevention to a dynamic, diverse and rapidly growing elderly population. Since chronology does not always equal physiology, younger patients with significant medical, physical, mental disabilities and sensory deficits are eligible for treatment in Geriatric Dentistry. Students will learn the complexity of aging, patient management and the importance of dentistry in total patient care.

Global Tobacco Control - Johns Hopkins

Provides an introduction to global tobacco control. Presents the health and economic burden of tobacco use worldwide and highlights practical approaches to tobacco prevention, control, surveillance, and evaluation. Examines transnational tobacco control issues, including the following: the interpretation and packaging of epidemiologic evidence for policy makers, the determinants of tobacco addiction, the economics of global tobacco control, tobacco industry strategies, legal foundations for regulation, and basic surveillance and evaluation methods using lectures, case-studies, and discussion.

Health is everywhere: unraveling the mystery of health - The Open University

This unit considers two ideas: that health is an ever-present factor in our lives, and that health is something difficult to define. But how can we say that health is everywhere if it is so mysterious? How do we recognise health if it so difficult to define? There are no easy answers to these questions! In this unit we explore this paradox, not just because it is a fascinating dilemma but because understanding health in all its multifaceted complexity is a prerequisite to working for health in imaginative, creative and useful ways, in both our private and our public lives.

Health Assessment and Promotion - U Mass Boston

This course focuses on the complete health assessment, the nursing process, and its relationship to the prevention and early detection of disease in clients across the life span. This course introduces processes of health assessment: interviewing, history-taking, and physical assessment. Dominant models, theories and perspectives are used to explain health behavior are considered in relation to evidence-based health promotion and health education strategies. Students are also expected to identify and apply pathophysiological principles to selected health issues across the lifespan.

Health Across the Life Span: Frameworks, Contexts, and Measurements - Johns Hopkins

Introduces and examines the basic prinicples which guide growth and development and the health of individuals across the lifespan, from the prenatal period through senescence. Presents methodological, conceptual and substantive issues necessary for understanding and evaluating empirically based information about growth, development and health at different stages of life and from different academic perspectives.

Health Issues for Aging Populations - Johns Hopkins

Introduces the study of aging, its implications for individuals, families, and society, and the background for health policy related to older persons. Presents an overview on aging from different perspectives: demography, biology, epidemiology of diseases, physical and mental disorders, functional capacity and disability, health services, federal and state health policies, social aspects of aging, and ethical issues in the care of older individuals.

Histology - Tufts University

Histology is the study of microscopic anatomy dealing with the structures of cells, tissue and organs in relation to their functions. The first part of the course deals with basic tissues (a collection of similar cells and the extracellular matrices surrounding them): epithelium; connective tissues, including blood, bone and cartilage; muscles; and nerves. The second part of the course deals with organs, systemic arrangement of tissues performing a specific function, as of respiration, digestion, etc.

Histology: Study of Cells, Tissues, and Organs - Tufts University

This course presents the microscopic structure of cells, tissues, and organs, with emphasis on the correlation of structure and function. Vignettes of clinical and pathologic significance are also presented.

The History of Public Health - Johns Hopkins

In the History of Public Health we will examine the historical experience of health and illness from a population perspective. This material seeks to reveal how the organization of societies facilitates or mitigates the production and transmission of disease. It also asks how do populations and groups of individuals go about securing their health? One key theme is the medical management of space in one form or another - from the public space of the environment through institutional spaces such as schools and workplaces to personal/individual body space.

Homelessness and need - The Open University

The majority of people who sleep on the streets, and in hostels and night shelters are men. However, the number of women, particularly younger women, in these circumstances has increased (Anderson et al., 1993). They are often people with complex care and support needs, which go way beyond the provision of accommodation. But, as you will learn in this unit, complex needs are both a cause and a product of homelessness.

How Dangerous is Breathing: Statistical Methods in Air Pollution Risk Estimation - Johns Hopkins

This lecture explores the statistical methods used for assessing the health effects of air pollution. Dr. Dominici uses examples from her own national-level research.

Human Growth and Development - Johns Hopkins

We will study the subject matter in two ways: by following various developmental "tracks" longitudinally from birth to death and by studying the individual at various cross-sectional stages/ages of life.

Impact of Pandemic Influenza on Public Health - Johns Hopkins

This training examines the path of the avian influenza and examines how it could impact world health. This presentation's content is part of a non-credit, professional development training generated by JHSPH faculty and the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness. The OCW version of this presentation comprises slides only. A full version, including synchronized audio is available at no charge by visiting the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness (registration required).

Implant Dentistry - Tufts University

This course is devoted to the fundamentals of Implant Dentistry in order to provide students with basic concepts and foundation for the discussion of the diagnosis, treatment planning and sequence of treatment with the patients, practice coordinators and prosthodontic faculty members. Within this first semester, students will explore all simple to moderate implant prosthodontic treatment modalities for patient care in the predoctoral clinic. More complex implant treatment plans that involve advanced prosthodontic or surgical procedures and/or Type IV patients based on Tufts Patient Classification System will be discussed and referral procedures to the Post Graduate Prosthodontics Clinic and/or the Implant Center, when indicated, will be presented.

Improving aerobic fitness - The Open University

Aerobic fitness is integral to successful sports performance and to maintaining good health. But what sort of exercise should you be doing to develop your aerobic fitness? This unit will help you to answer this question by introducing you to principles of aerobic exercise prescription.

Improving Understanding and Collaboration among First Responders - Johns Hopkins

This unique training addresses the institutional culture of five responder groups: law enforcement, EMS, fire, public health, and private security in an attempt at fostering understanding among these groups. This presentation's content is part of a non-credit, professional development training generated by JHU faculty and the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness. The OCW version of this presentation comprises slides only. A full version, including synchronized audio is available at no charge by visiting the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness (registration required).

Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future - MIT

This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class.

International Nutrition - Johns Hopkins

Presents major nutritional problems that influence the health, survival, and developmental capacity of populations in developing societies. Covers approaches implemented at the household, community, national, and international levels to improve nutritional status. Explores the degree to which malnutrition can be prevented or reduced prior to achieving full economic development through targeted public and private sector interventions that address the causes of malnutrition.

Introducing social work practice - The Open University

Social work is a vital element in how our society cares for those in need. This unit looks at the meaning of 'social work values' as well as the different approaches to social work and the skills involved.

Introduction to Clinical Pain Problems - Tufts University

This course will introduce the general principles of biomedical evaluation and management of common clinical pain problems. It will present ways to evaluate the biomedical characteristics of the pain experience - temporal pattern, severity, location, quality, intensity and exacerbating and relieving factors. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed upon viewing superficially diverse pain syndromes as part of a fundamentally unified group of processes.

Introduction to Demographic Methods - Johns Hopkins

This course introduces the basic techniques of demographic analysis. Students will become familiar with the sources of data available for demographic research. Population composition and change measures will be presented. Measures of mortality, fertility, marriage and migration levels and patterns will be defined. Life table, standardization and population projection techniques will also be explored.

Introduction to Health Policy - Johns Hopkins

Introduces the material covered in the Department of Health Policy and Management. Focuses on four substantive areas that form the analytic basis for many of the issues in Health Policy and Management. The areas are: (1) economics and financing, (2) need and demand, (3) politics/ethics/law, and (4) quality/effectiveness. Illustrates these issues using three specific policy issues: (1) injury, (2) medical care, and (3) public health preparedness.

Introduction to Mental Health and Disaster Preparedness - Johns Hopkins

This presentation introduces the topics of disaster mental health services, mental health surge capacity, and psychiatric first aid. This presentation's content is part of a non-credit, professional development training generated by JHSPH faculty and the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness. The OCW version of this presentation comprises slides only. A full version, including synchronized audio is available at no charge by visiting the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness (registration required).

Introduction to Methods for Health Services Research and Evaluation - Johns Hopkins

Introduction to Methods for Health Services Research and Evaluation provides an introduction to basic methods for undertaking research and program evaluation within health services organizations and systems. In addition to basic methods, the course also provides "the state of the art" in research and evaluation through the review of major completed studies. This course is recommended for students who will be carrying out policy research, social science research, or program impact evaluation within health delivery systems. It is also relevant to those who will apply the results of Health Services Research (HSR) done by others.

Introduction to Neuroscience - MIT

This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement, learning and memory, and diseases of the brain.

Issues in Complementary and Alternative Medicine - The Open University

Why are so many people now turning to complementary and alternative medicine and why do approaches to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) raise such controversy? This unit explores the following three key areas: 'Why people use complementary and alternative medicine', 'Critical issues in the therapeutic relationship' and 'Ethics in complementary and alternative medicine'.

Johns Hopkins Faculty Interviews - Johns Hopkins

In these interviews, JHSPH faculty deliver expert insight into some of the most important public health challenges facing the world today. These interviews were produced by the JHSPH Office of Communications and Public Affairs. Other video presentations are available in the JHSPH Media Archive.

Laboratory on the Physiology, Acoustics, and Perception of Speech - MIT

The course focuses on experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics include: measurement of articulatory movements, measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production, computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech, synthesis of speech, perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds, speech prosody, models for speech recognition, speech disorders, and other topics.

Law and Veterinary Medicine - Tufts University

This course acquaints students with basic concepts of law, as well as ethics. The course also seeks to enable students to practice medicine more prudently through application of legal rules. Although substantive standards of law are presented, the course stresses the role of process and creative thought in the development and application of legal and moral principles.

Lennox Castle Hospital - The Open University

This unit looks at the history of institutions in the twentieth century, starting with a case study of Lennox Castle Hospital. It tries to make sense of the history of Lennox Castle, and of institutional life in general, through testimony of those who experienced institutions as inmates and as nurses, as well as through Erving Goffman's medel of the 'total institution'. It examines the social bases of segragation, the professionalisation of staff in asylums and institutions, and campaigns for change in the treatment of those segragated from society in institutions.

LETS: A community development - The Open University

This unit enables you to hear about some of the participants in the Local Exchange and Trading Schemes (LETS). These are associations of people who make offers of goods and services to and from each other. What is on offer and the requests people make are listed in local directories.

Life Stories - The Open University

This unit examines life stories. It looks at the way in which objects, trends, cultures or disabilities may contribute to a person's identity. This unit also considers the contribution that our own life stories make to who we are, and how remembering and revisiting our past may help us to move forward with our lives.

Living with death and dying - The Open University

This unit will explore how knowledge and beliefs about death and encounters with death affect people's lives. It will also examine the concept of a 'good death' from an individual perspective in order to enhance the quality of dying.

Magnetic Resonance Analytic, Biochemical, and Imaging Techniques - MIT

This course is an introduction to basic NMR theory. Examples of biochemical data obtained using NMR are summarized along with other related experiments. Students participate in detailed study of NMR imaging techniques, including discussions of basic cross-sectional image reconstruction, image contrast, flow and real-time imaging, and hardware design considerations. Exposure to laboratory NMR spectroscopic and imaging equipment is included.

Malariology - Johns Hopkins

Presents issues related to malaria as a major public health problem. Emphasizes the biology of malaria parasites and factors affecting their transmission to humans by anopheline vectors. Topics include host-parasite-vector relationships; diagnostics; parasite biology; vector biology; epidemiology; host immunity; risk factors associated with infection, human behavior, chemotherapy, and drug resistances; anti-vector measures; vaccine development; and management and policy issues.

Managed Care and Health Insurance - Johns Hopkins

Presents an overview of major issues related to the design, function, management, regulation, and evaluation of health insurance and managed care plans. Provides a firm foundation in basic concepts pertaining to private and public sector health insurance/benefit plans, both as provided by employers and government agencies such as Medicaid and Medicare. Key topics include population care management techniques, provider payment, organizational integration, quality and accountability, cost-containment, and public policy. The course makes extensive use of outside experts Course is relevant for management- or policy-oriented students who will be working in, or interrelating with, public and private (both for-profit and not-for-profit) health insurance plans and organized delivery systems such as HMOs and hospital/physician "integrated" delivery systems.

Managing Long-Term Care for Aging Populations - Johns Hopkins

This course will consider long-term service delivery programs designed to meet the special needs of seniors. It will review care and service systems from the unique perspective of an aging population, including the physiological and psychological changes common among seniors. Students will become conversant with a conceptual framework for planning, organizing, and delivering services to the elderly, including the ability to define the major physical, mental and psychosocial changes and health problems that accompany aging and their applicability to program development.

Managing to meet service users' needs - The Open University

Frontline managers are responsible for gathering service user views on their needs. Whose views should be taken into account? How do managers gather views? This unit helps you consider ways of getting feedback from service users, and shows the inclusive approach of a manager of a voluntary sector mental health service.

Medical Artificial Intelligence - MIT

This course provides an intensive introduction to artificial intelligence and its applications to problems of medical diagnosis, therapy selection, and monitoring and learning from databases. It meets with lectures and recitations of 6.034 Artificial Intelligence, whose material is supplemented by additional medical-specific readings in a weekly discussion session. Students are responsible for completing all homework assignments in 6.034 and for additional problems and/or papers.

Medical Computing - MIT

The focus of the course is on medical science and practice in the age of automation and the genome, both present and future. It includes an analysis of the computational needs of clinical medicine, a review systems and approaches that have been used to support those needs, and an examination of new technologies.

Medical Decision Support - MIT

This course presents the main concepts of decision analysis, artificial intelligence and predictive model construction and evaluation in the specific context of medical applications. It emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems and provides hands-on experience. Its technical focus is on decision support, knowledge-based systems (qualitative and quantitative), learning systems (including logistic regression, classification trees, neural networks, rough sets), and techniques to evaluate the performance of such systems. It reviews computer-based diagnosis, planning and monitoring of therapeutic interventions. It also discusses implemented medical applications and the software tools used in their construction. Students produce a final project using the machine learning methods learned in the course, based on actual clinical data.

Medical Product Quality Systems - UC Irvine

Learn about the essential elements of Quality System Regulations (QSR's) and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP's), how there is a commonality between them, and how to develop a global approach to Quality Systems in order to satisfy international requirements of ISO 9001:2000 and ISO 13485:2003. A detailed analysis of these systems and practical 'how to' recommendations and approaches are presented, with particular emphasis on the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) QSR's and GMP's.

Medicine I - Tufts University

This course provides the following competencies: to be able to do a complete medical history, dental history, physical examination and intraoral assessment from a dental and a clinical pathology perspective on a patient in the dental setting; to have a basic understanding of the "highest priority illnesses" including some of the symptoms and signs associated with those illnesses; to have a good understanding of common antibiotics encountered in dentistry and to have some knowledge of local anesthetics and analgesics used in dentistry.

Medicine II - Tufts University

Medicine II is the second in a series of three courses that provides medical instruction for the dental student. This course teaches the student to evaluate systemic health problems and appropriately apply the knowledge in a future clinical setting. Topics covered are Hepatitis/Cirrhosis, HIV/AIDS, Pulmonary, Hematology, Coagulation, Otolaryngology, Pregnancy, LFT's, Hepatic Serology, Medical Emergencies, Endocrinology, Immunology, Oncology, Cardiology, Transplants.

Medicine III: Hospital Clerkship Program - Tufts University

This practicum enables the student to assess the level of compromise in the history and physical examination of a medically compromised patient and modify dental care appropriately and to be competent in the assessment and management of a medically compromised dental patient in a clinical setting.

Meeting minority needs - The Open University

This unit will help you understand how it is possible to meet the needs of a particular minority community: the Chinese who live in Northern Ireland. The audio file outlines some of the problems that this community are facing as well as describing the differences experienced by older Chinese inhabitants who require care and support.

Mental Health Practice: Bonnyrigg - The Open University

Although society's attitude toward mental illness has improved, discrimination and misconceptions surrounding those affected are still prevalent. This unit explores a number of issues relating to mental health practice, including the difference between mental health and mental illness, and the discrimination that can arise when people experience some form of mental distress.

Methods in Biostatistics I - Johns Hopkins

Presents fundamental concepts in applied probability, exploratory data analysis, and statistical inference, focusing on probability and analysis of one and two samples. Topics include discrete and continuous probability models; expectation and variance; central limit theorem; inference, including hypothesis testing and confidence for means, proportions, and counts; maximum likelihood estimation; sample size determinations; elementary non-parametric methods; graphical displays; and data transformations.

Methods in Biostatistics II - Johns Hopkins

Presents fundamental concepts in applied probability, exploratory data analysis, and statistical inference, focusing on probability and analysis of one and two samples. Topics include discrete and continuous probability models; expectation and variance; central limit theorem; inference, including hypothesis testing and confidence for means, proportions, and counts; maximum likelihood estimation; sample size determinations; elementary non-parametric methods; graphical displays; and data transformations.

Modeling Issues in Speech and Hearing - MIT

This course explores the theory and practice of scientific modeling in the context of auditory and speech biophysics. Based on seminar-style discussions of the research literature, the class draws on examples from hearing and speech, and explores general, meta-theoretical issues that transcend the particular subject matter. Examples include: What is a model? What is the process of model building? What are the different approaches to modeling? What is the relationship between theory and experiment? How are models tested? What constitutes a good model?

Molecular Biology for the Auditory System - MIT

An introductory course in the molecular biology of the auditory system. First half focuses on human genetics and molecular biology, covering fundamentals of pedigree analysis, linkage analysis, molecular cloning, and gene analysis as well as ethical/legal issues, all in the context of an auditory disorder. Second half emphasizes molecular approaches to function and dysfunction of the cochlea, and is based on readings and discussion of research literature.

MPH Capstone Honor Recipients 2008 - Johns Hopkins

MPH candidates are required to prepare capstone projects to complete their degree program. Each year, special honors were given to ten students for the best overall capstone projects. Presentations from three of the ten 2008 honors recipients are posted.

Musculoskeletal Pathophysiology - MIT

This course covers the growth, development and structure of normal bone and joints, the biomechanics of bone connective tissues, and their response to stress, calcium and phosphate homeostasis. Additional topics include regulation by parathyroid hormone and vitamin D, the pathogenesis of metabolic bone diseases and diseases of connective tissues, joints and muscle with consideration of possible mechanisms and underlying metabolic derangements.

Musculoskeletal Pathophysiology - Tufts University

This course teaches students about disorders that affect the musculoskeletal system. The students will become familiar with the immunology and pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases that may predominantly affect joints but also affect multiple organ systems of the body in some diseases.

Music Perception and Cognition - MIT

This course is a survey of perceptual and cognitive aspects of the psychology of music, with special emphasis on underlying neuronal and neurocomputational representations and mechanisms. Basic perceptual dimensions of hearing (pitch, timbre, consonance/roughness, loudness, auditory grouping) form salient qualities, contrasts, patterns and streams that are used in music to convey melody, harmony, rhythm and separate voices. Perceptual, cognitive, and neurophysiological aspects of the temporal dimension of music (rhythm, timing, duration, temporal expectation) are explored.

Narrative Ethics: Literary Texts and Moral Issue in Medicine - MIT

This eight-session course, designed for a mixed group of first, second, third and fourth-year medical students, uses literary narratives and poetry to study ethical issues in medicine. This methodology emphasizes the importance of context, contingency, and circumstances in recognizing, evaluating, and resolving moral problems. The seminar will focus on developing the skills of critical and reflective reading that increase effectiveness in clinical medicine. Texts will include short fiction and poetry by authors such as Woolf, Chekhov, Carver, Kafka, Hurston, Marquez and Tolstoy.

Neural Coding and the Perception of Sound - MIT

This course focuses on neural structures and mechanisms mediating the detection, localization and recognition of sounds. Discussions cover how acoustic signals are coded by auditory neurons, the impact of these codes on behavioral performance, and the circuitry and cellular mechanisms underlying signal transformations. Topics include temporal coding, neural maps and feature detectors, learning and plasticity, and feedback control. General principles are conveyed by theme discussions of auditory masking, sound localization, musical pitch, speech coding, and cochlear implants.

Noninvasive Imaging in Biology and Medicine - MIT

22.56J aims to give graduate students and advanced undergraduates background in the theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods to biology and medicine, with emphasis on neuroimaging. The course focuses on the modalities most frequently used in scientific research (X-ray CT, PET/SPECT, MRI, and optical imaging), and includes discussion of molecular imaging approaches used in conjunction with these scanning methods. Lectures by the professor will be supplemented by in-class discussions of problems in research, and hands-on demonstrations of imaging systems.

Nursing Fundamentals - Kaplan University

Welcome to Nursing Fundamentals. This course introduces you to the fundamentals of nursing and wellness. This course discusses patient safety, monitoring vital signs, initial assessment, bathing and grooming, personal care, and assisting with mobility. You will learn how to effectively document patient records and provide reports to other providers.

Professional Issues in Nursing - U Mass Boston

This is the first nursing course in the RN-BS Online Program. It is an intermediate seminar designed to assist registered nurses to develop the critical reading, thinking and writing skills necessary for successful university level study. Issues that significantly influence professional practice and nursing leadership are explored utilizing the above skills.

Health Assessment and Promotion - U Mass Boston

This course focuses on the complete health assessment, the nursing process, and its relationship to the prevention and early detection of disease in clients across the life span. This course introduces processes of health assessment: interviewing, history-taking, and physical assessment. Dominant models, theories and perspectives are used to explain health behavior are considered in relation to evidence-based health promotion and health education strategies. Students are also expected to identify and apply pathophysiological principles to selected health issues across the lifespan.

Nursing Fundamanetals - Kaplan University

Welcome to Nursing Fundamentals. This course introduces you to the fundamentals of nursing and wellness. This course discusses patient safety, monitoring vital signs, initial assessment, bathing and grooming, personal care, and assisting with mobility. You will learn how to effectively document patient records and provide reports to other providers.

Nutrition and Medicine - Tufts University

This course teaches basic nutrition principles that are relevant to other medical courses such as pathology, growth and development, and pharmacology. The student can then integrate the role of nutrition into issues of overall health and disease development.

Ophthamology Grand Rounds - Tufts University

Interesting cases from the weekly New England Eye Center Grand Rounds are presented and discussed. References are available for further study.

Oral Public Health and Community Service Program - Tufts University

This program examines the impact of society, disparate cultures, attitudes, health beliefs and risk behaviors on oral public health. The fundamental principles and practices of public health, epidemiology, civic engagement, and community service are presented from a practical and applied perspective. The significance of oral diseases and disorders as a "silent epidemic" and their grave impact on general health and well-being is emphasized, including specific examples of current issues and "hot topics" in oral public health. Strategies and methods to overcome existing substantial impediments to oral healthcare access for the most needy, vulnerable and underserved populations, is discussed from the perspective of community-based healthcare systems development.

Pathophysiology and Endocrinology, and Diabetes and Metabolism - Tufts University

The endocrine system has always had a certain mystique among scientists, clinicians and the general public. More recently, new hormones and complex endocrine pathways have been discovered that have increased our understanding of normal human physiology and behavior and provided insights into the pathophysiology of various diseases. As a result of these recent advances, the endocrine system has assumed a prominent role in our understanding and management of common medical conditions including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity and aging.

Pathophysiology of Infectious Disease - Tufts University

The intent of the course is to provide a background into the clinical and pathophysiologic aspects of infectious disease of organ systems. Given the contact hours, the course can only be an introduction. We trust that you will discover that the practice of Infectious Disease is akin to detective work: whether related to research or clinical care, we are always asking What is it? Where did it come from? Where did it go? We are not limited to an organ or even a type of patient – Like many microbes, we cross boundaries to visit surgical, neurologic, dermatologic, hematologic, or critically ill patients to name a few and thus have a varied, challenging and exciting daily experience.

Personal Preparedness Planning for Public Health Workers - Johns Hopkins

Public health workers need to understand and implement basic concepts of personal preparedness planning so that they can function effectively as public health emergency responders in a post-9/11 world. These basic preparedness strategies can be applied to meet a broad range of public health emergency response challenges, including - but not limited to - acts of terrorism. Personal Preparedness Planning provides a practical introduction to these concepts that is tailored to the needs of public health responders and their families.

Pharmaceuticals Management for Under-Served Populations - Johns Hopkins

Students will be guided to analyze problems and develop strategies based on real world drug management issues including regulations, manufacture, procurement, distribution, safety, policy, financing and the unique aspects of international pharmaceutical trade, the role of the World Trade Organization - Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (WTO-TRIPS), government, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and individuals/programs in the selection and use of pharmaceutical products. Course materials are drawn from both developed and developing countries so that the student will be knowledgeable about the role of Essential Medicines and the formation of a National Drug Policy.

Physiology of the Ear - MIT

Topics for this course are based primarily on reading and discussions of original research literature that cover the analysis as well as the underlying physical and physiological mechanisms of acoustic signals in the auditory periphery. Topics include the acoustics, mechanics, and hydrodynamics of sound transmission; the biophysical basis for cochlear amplification; the physiology of hair-cell transduction and synaptic transmission; efferent feedback control; the analysis and coding of simple and complex sounds by the inner ear; and the physiological bases for hearing disorders.

Population Change and Public Health - Johns Hopkins

This course introduces the basic elements of population studies, including: population size, composition, and distribution, and the causes and consequences of changes in these characteristics. An overview of demographic processes and measures used to assess them is presented. The course also focuses on reproductive health issues important in the context of Sub-Saharan Africa. The impact of population policies and programs on population change will be analyzed for different countries. Current issues and problems in program design, implementation, and evaluation will be outlined with the help of several case studies.

Population Health - Tufts University

This course is designed to challenge and encourage you, as veterinary students, to explore the relationships between population health and public health, animal health and human health, and clinical and population-based health practice. In general, we will confine our discussions in this course to veterinary public health in the United States except when it easier to illustrate a point or concept using an example from elsewhere.

Population Medicine - Tufts University

The purpose of this course is to shift your attention away from the pathophysiologic effects of disease on individuals, and refocus it on a much bigger question: what connection will you and your patients have with the health of the public? In this course, we will use the elderly as a model population to explore the intersection between clinical practice and population medicine.

Preclinical Complete Denture Prosthodontics - Tufts University

This is the introductory course to the treatment of the edentulous patient and continues as the student progresses to the Advanced Clinical Complete Denture Lecture Series and the clinical treatment of patients.

Preventing Infant Mortality and Promoting the Heath of Women, Infants, and Children - Johns Hopkins

This course focuses on the historical problems and interventions associated with infant mortality. Describes the scientific basis for infant mortality and analyzes causes and consequences in a population and development of a programmatic and policy approach.

Principle and Practice of Human Pathology - MIT

This course provides a comprehensive overview of human pathology with emphasis on mechanisms of disease and diagnostic medicine.

Principles and Practice of Drug Development - MIT

This course serves as a description and critical assessment of the major issues and stages of developing a pharmaceutical or biopharmaceutical. Topics covered include drug discovery, preclinical development, clinical investigation, manufacturing and regulatory issues considered for small and large molecules, and economic and financial considerations of the drug development process. A multidisciplinary perspective is provided by the faculty, who represent clinical, life, and management sciences. Various industry guests also participate.

Principles and Practice Tissue Engineering - MIT

The principles and practice of tissue engineering (and regenerative medicine) are taught by faculty of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The principles underlying strategies for employing selected cells, biomaterial scaffolds, soluble regulators or their genes, and mechanical loading and culture conditions, for the regeneration of tissues and organs in vitro and in vivo are addressed. Differentiated cell types and stem cells are compared and contrasted for this application, as are natural and synthetic scaffolds. Methodology for the preparation of cells and scaffolds in practice is described.

Principles of Drug Development - Johns Hopkins

Presents principles underlying preclinical and clinical development of new therapeutic drugs and procedures. Describes and evaluates specific examples, and discusses legal and ethical regulations that apply to drug development.

Principles of Human Development - Johns Hopkins

Principles of Human Nutrition (222.641) provides an integrated overview of the physiological requirements and functions of protein, energy, and the major vitamins and minerals that are determinants of health and diseases in human populations.

Principles of Industrial Hygiene - Johns Hopkins

Principles of Industrial Hygiene provides an introduction to the field of industrial hygiene and to occupational health in general. The instructor focuses on introducing concepts, terminology, and methodology in the practice of industrial hygiene and identifies resource materials. The class would benefit those wishing to pursue a Master's degree in industrial hygiene, those wishing to complete a certificate in occupational health, or for students in allied health fields needing a basic understanding of industrial hygiene.

Principles of Pharmacology - MIT

The object of the course is to teach students an approach to the study of pharmacologic agents. It is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopoeia. The focus is on the basic principles of biophysics, biochemistry and physiology, as related to the mechanisms of drug action, biodistribution and metabolism. The course consists of lectures and student-led case discussions. Topics covered include: mechanisms of drug action, dose-response relations, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery systems, drug metabolism, toxicity of pharmacological agents, drug interaction and substance abuse. Selected agents and classes of agents are examined in detail.

Principles of Radiation Interaction - MIT

The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed.

Problem Solving for Immunization Programs - Johns Hopkins

Countries around the world - even those at war - are collaborating to ensure that children under the age of five don't die from diseases for which vaccines are available. In the past twenty years, global vaccine coverage has surpassed eighty percent, and a second disease, polio, is nearly eradicated. In the United States, coverage rates are even higher, and vaccine-preventible diseases are now rare. Never have so many resources been focused on immunization - yet problems remain. Additional, highly effective vaccines have been developed but still do not reach the majority of children. More worrisome, currently high immunization rates may be unsustainable for a number of reasons. This material will cover immunization basics and survey the public health, sociological, and economic literature, identifying and analyzing common problems using a standard problem-solving approach.

Professional Issues in Nursing - U Mass Boston

This is the first nursing course in the RN-BS Online Program. It is an intermediate seminar designed to assist registered nurses to develop the critical reading, thinking and writing skills necessary for successful university level study. Issues that significantly influence professional practice and nursing leadership are explored utilizing the above skills.

Projects in Microscale Engineering for Life Sciences - MIT

This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building.

Psychiatric Epidemiology - Johns Hopkins

Psychiatric Epidemiology reviews descriptive and analytic epidemiology for major mental disorders of childhood, adulthood, and late adult life. The course will also examine issues of classification and the nosology of psychiatric disorders as well as operational case definitions and the measurement techniques to enhance field surveys and risk factor research.

Public Health Biology - Johns Hopkins

Offers an integrative molecular and biological perspective on public health problems. Explores population biology and ecological principles underlying public health and reviews molecular biology in relation to public health biology. Modules focus on specific diseases of viral, bacterial, and environmental origin. Uses specific examples of each type to develop the general principles that govern interactions among susceptible organisms and etiologic agents. Devotes special attention to factors that act in reproduction and development. Places emphasis on common elements encountered in these modules. These may include origin and dissemination of drug resistance, organization and transmission of virulence determinants, modulation of immune responses, disruption of signal transduction pathways, and perturbation of gene expression. Also considers the role of the genetic constitution of the host.

Public Health Practice 101 - Johns Hopkins

A series of presentations developed to introduce health department employees to the basic terms and concepts that they are likely to encounter in the field.

Public Health Toxicology - Johns Hopkins

This course examines basic concepts of environmental toxicology, including distribution, cellular penetration, metabolic conversion, and elimination of toxic agents, as well as the fundamental laws governing the interaction of foreign chemicals with biological systems. The course also focuses on the application of these concepts to the understanding and prevention of mortality and morbidity resulting from environmental exposure to toxic substances through a case study format.

Quantitative Genomics - MIT

This course provides a foundation in the following four areas: evolutionary and population genetics; comparative genomics; structural genomics and proteomics; and functional genomics and regulation.

Quantitative Genomics - MIT

This course provides a foundation in the following four areas: evolutionary and population genetics; comparative genomics; structural genomics and proteomics; and functional genomics and regulation.

Quantitative Data Analysis - Johns Hopkins

This course emphasizes the analysis of ethnographic and other forms of qualitative data in public health research. We introduce various interpretive analytic approaches, explore their use, and guide students in applying them to data. We also introduce the use of computer software for coding textual data (Atlas.ti). Students analyze data they have collected as part of fieldwork projects initiated in 410.690 and write up the results in a final paper. Classroom sessions include lectures, discussions, intensive group work related to the fieldwork projects, and instruction in the computer lab.

Quantitative Physiology: Cells and Tissues - MIT

In this subject, we consider two basic topics in cellular biophysics, posed here as questions: which molecules are transported across cellular membranes, and what are the mechanisms of transport? How do cells maintain their compositions, volume, and membrane potential? How are potentials generated across the membranes of cells? What do these potentials do? Although the questions posed are fundamentally biological questions, the methods for answering these questions are inherently multidisciplinary. As we will see throughout the course, the role of mathematical models is to express concepts precisely enough that precise conclusions can be drawn. In connection with all the topics covered, we will consider both theory and experiment.

Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems - MIT

This course elaborates on the application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. It discusses mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. It also discusses anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. There is emphasis on those systems, features, and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences.

Radiation Terror 101 - Johns Hopkins

This topic introduces you to general radiation principles, radiation safety and protection, and the basic types of radiological terror, and also provides practical guidance on acute response techniques and general countermeasures. This presentation's content is part of a non-credit, professional development training generated by JHSPH faculty and the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness. The OCW version of this presentation comprises slides only. A full version, including synchronized audio is available at no charge by visiting the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness (registration required).

Refugee Health Care - Johns Hopkins

Refugee Health Care addresses the provision of basic health requirements for refugees and the coordination of care among the agencies concerned with them.

Regulatory Requirements for Pharmaceutical Products - UC Irvine

This course presents a detailed overview of the regulatory requirements for the development and manufacture of pharmaceutical products. Individuals involved in manufacturing, quality control, research and development, and clinical studies will learn the latest information. Explore topics that include the product development process through commercialization; product characterization and pre-clinical evaluation; pharmaceutical industry requirements; clinical trial requirements, good manufacturing practices (GMPs); good laboratory practices (GLPs); FDA inspections, labeling, and advertising of medical products; and preparing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) submissions.

Renal Pathophysiology - Tufts University

This course reviews how the kidneys adapt to extra-renal disturbances and explores disorders that arise from primary defects in kidney function. In addition, the course explores the pathogenesis and therapy of chronic kidney disease and the consequences of kidney failure.

Reproductive Perinatal Epidemiology - Johns Hopkins

This course focuses on current research, controversial issues, and methodological problems in the epidemiology of reproductive and perinatal health. Lectures and analyses of research papers present reproductive health issues such as conception and infertility, contraception and hormone supplementation safety including effects on reproductive cancers , as well as perinatal issues such as complications of pregnancy, infections in pregnancy, maternal mortality, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and birth defects.

Sexual Health, HIV/STI, and Human Rights - Johns Hopkins

* Human rights abrogation or protection can affect the health of individuals, communities, and populations. * Sexual rights violations are a subset of threats to human dignity. Forced, coerced, and higher risk sexual exposures are highly correlated with adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes - including STI and HIV. * Responses that address human rights may improve STI prevention and control, and better human rights contexts for those at risk.

Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health - Johns Hopkins

The course is designed to help students develop basic literacy regarding social concepts and processes that influence health status and public health interventions. The course also hopes to help students develop insight into populations with whom they have worked in the past or will work in the future, and to develop one kind of effective writing tool (the narrative) for communicating about psychosocial issues in public health. These overall aims are approached through lectures, discussion, readings, workshopping, individual compositions, and group discussion of student writings.

Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health Care - Johns Hopkins

Social and Behavioral Foundations of Primary Health Care aims at providing you with the knowledge and skills needed to diagnose (understand) community, individual, and organizational behaviors and change processes in developing countries and in cross-cultural settings as a foundation for planning culturally appropriate primary health care (PHC) in the context of the ecological model of health behavior.

Social care, social work and the law – England and Wales - The Open University

This unit is made up of four extracts related to social care, social work and the law. The extracts are stand-alone sections but follow on from each other to make up this unit. You will be introduced to five main themes that shape practice in the field of social care and social work. The aim of this unit is to enhance your understanding of the relationship between social work practice and the law.

Social Studies of Bioscience and Biotech - MIT

In this course, social, ethical and clinical issues associated with the development of new biotechnologies and their integration into clinical practice is discussed. Basic scientists, clinicians, bioethicists, and social scientists present on the following four general topics: changing political economy of biotech research; problems associated with the adaption of new biotechnologies and findings from molecular biology for clinical settings; the ethical issues that emerge from clinical research and clinical use of new technologies; and the broader social ethics of access and inequality.

Special Care in Dentistry - Tufts University

Special Care in Dentistry is a curriculum designed to introduce you to some characteristics and dental care needs of persons with special needs. These units are designed to increase your knowledge and awareness of patients with developmental disabilities, and provide you with practical tools for providing high-quality care.

Speech Communication - MIT

6.541J surveys the structural properties of natural languages, with special emphasis on the sound pattern. Topics covered include: representation of the lexicon; physiology of speech production; articulatory phonetics; acoustical theory of speech production; acoustical and articulatory descriptions of phonetic features and of prosodic aspects of speech; perception of speech; models of lexical access and of speech production and planning; and applications to recognition and generation of speech by machine, and to the study of speech disorders.

Statistical Methods for Sample Surveys - Johns Hopkins

Presents construction of sampling frames, area sampling, methods of estimation, stratified sampling, subsampling, and sampling methods for surveys of human populations. Students use STATA or another comparable package to implement designs and analyses of survey data.

Statistical Physics in Biology - MIT

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.

Statistical Reasoning I - Johns Hopkins

Statistical Reasoning in Public Health provides a broad overview of biostatistical methods and concepts used in the public health sciences, emphasizing interpretation and concepts rather than calculations or mathematical details. It develops ability to read the scientific literature to critically evaluate study designs and methods of data analysis, and it introduces basic concepts of statistical inference, including hypothesis testing, p-values, and confidence intervals. Topics include comparisons of means and proportions; the normal distribution; regression and correlation; confounding; concepts of study design, including randomization, sample size, and power considerations; logistic regression; and an overview of some methods in survival analysis. The course draws examples of the use and abuse of statistical methods from the current biomedical literature.

Statistical Reasoning II - Johns Hopkins

Statistical Reasoning in Public Health II provides a broad overview of biostatistical methods and concepts used in the public health sciences, emphasizing interpretation and concepts rather than calculations or mathematical details. It develops ability to read the scientific literature to critically evaluate study designs and methods of data analysis. It introduces basic concepts of statistical inference, including hypothesis testing, p-values, and confidence intervals. Topics include comparisons of means and proportions; the normal distribution; regression and correlation; confounding; concepts of study design, including randomization, sample size, and power considerations; logistic regression; and an overview of some methods in survival analysis. The course draws examples of the use and abuse of statistical methods from the current biomedical literature.

Statistics for Laboratory Scientists I - Johns Hopkins

This course introduces the basic concepts and methods of statistics with applications in the experimental biological sciences. Demonstrates methods of exploring, organizing, and presenting data, and introduces the fundamentals of probability. Presents the foundations of statistical inference, including the concepts of parameters and estimates and the use of the likelihood function, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests. Topics include experimental design, linear regression, the analysis of two-way tables, sample size and power calculations, and a selection of the following: permutation tests, the bootstrap, survival analysis, longitudinal data analysis, nonlinear regression, and logistic regression. Introduces and employs the freely-available statistical software, R, to explore and analyze data.

Statistics for Laboratory Scientists II - Johns Hopkins

This course introduces the basic concepts and methods of statistics with applications in the experimental biological sciences. Demonstrates methods of exploring, organizing, and presenting data, and introduces the fundamentals of probability. Presents the foundations of statistical inference, including the concepts of parameters and estimates and the use of the likelihood function, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests. Topics include experimental design, linear regression, the analysis of two-way tables, sample size and power calculations, and a selection of the following: permutation tests, the bootstrap, survival analysis, longitudinal data analysis, nonlinear regression, and logistic regression. Introduces and employs the freely-available statistical software, R, to explore and analyze data.

Statistics in Psychosocial Research: Measurement - Johns Hopkins

Presents quantitative approaches to measurement in the psychological and social sciences. Topics include the principles of psychometrics, including reliability and validity; the statistical basis for latent variable analysis, including exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and latent class analysis; and item response theory. Draws examples from the social sciences, including stress and distress, social class and socioeconomic status, personality; consumer satisfaction, functional impairment and disability, quality of life, and the measurement of overall health status. Intended for doctoral students.

Statistics in Psychosocial Research: Structural Models - Johns Hopkins

Presents quantitative approaches to theory construction in the context of multiple response variables, with models for both continuous and categorical data. Topics include the statistical basis for causal inference; principles of path analysis; linear structural equation analysis incorporating measurement models; latent class regression; and analysis of panel data with observed and latent variable models. Draws examples from the social sciences, including the status attainment approach to intergenerational mobility, behavior genetics models of disease and environment, consumer satisfaction, functional impairment and disability, and quality of life.

STI Prevention: Using Epidemiology to inform Policy and Program - Johns Hopkins

Considers features of sexually transmitted diseases relevant to their control, reviewing the natural history of the infections and laboratory diagnoses. Emphasizes policy development and public health practice for STI control and prevention, including behavioral interventions and medical screening/treatment intervention of sexually transmitted diseases.

Stress Management - Weber State University

An introductory course focusing on the causes of stress, recognizing personal stressors and life change management for stress control.

Survival Skills for Researchers: The Responsible Conduct of Research - MIT

This course is designed to provide graduate students and postdoctoral associates with techniques that enhance both validity and responsible conduct in scientific practice. Lectures present practical steps for developing skills in scientific research and are combined with discussion of cases. The course covers study design, preparation of proposals and manuscripts, peer review, authorship, use of humans and non-human animals in research, allegations of misconduct, and intellectual property. Also discussed are mentoring relationships and career options. Aspects of responsible research conduct are integrated into lectures and case discussion as appropriate to the specific topic. This course also satisfies the training grant requirements of the NIH for education in the responsible conduct of research.

The Adult Careers Program - The Open University

This unit will help you to understand how people feel about being careers, and what their main concerns are.

The Art of Science Advice to Policy Makers: Lessons from the U.S. National Academies - Johns Hopkins

In this installment of the Bloomberg Leadership Series, Dr. Fineberg shares the personal experiences and professional insights that have informed his leadership style and his approach to formulating sound and persuasive policy recommendations.

The Beveridge vision - The Open University

This Unit looks at the work of William Beveridge in reforming the field of social welfare after World War II. Particular attention is paid to the attitude towards women and immigrants to the United Kingdom.

The boundaries of care - The Open University

In this unit, we are going to look at a number of situations which put a strain on the idea that caring is just 'being ordinary', including times when people are giving intimate care. In these special circumstances, since the normal rules do not apply, we have to develop a set of special rules to guide practice.

The Impact of Primary Care on Population Health - Johns Hopkins

This lecture summarizes Professor Leiyu Shi's recent work on primary care, the definition of primary care, and his research rationale and framework. It includes a close look at international primary care studies, US primary care studies, Metropolitan Statistical Area analyses, county-level studies, multi-level studies, meta-analyses, and US health center studies.

The Lexicon and Its Features - MIT

This course provides an overview of the distinctive features which distinguish sound categories of languages of the world. Theories which relate these categories to their acoustic and articulatory correlates, both universally and in particular languages, are covered. Models of word recognition by listeners, features, and phonological structure are also discussed. In addition, the course offers a variety of perspectives on these issues, drawn from Electrical Engineering, Linguistics and Cognitive Science.

The limits of primary care - The Open University

In this unit we explore questions of access to community services. To make what might be quite a dry task more challenging we use a fictionalised case study of two people for whom access to community services is particularly problematic. Jim and Marianne are both long-term heroin addicts. Additional problems associated with their addiction are homelessness and physical illness. Their situation raises both practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about entitlement to resources when their problems can be regarded as at least in part self-inflicted.

The meaning of home - The Open University

This unit looks at the way people identify and become attached to places, buildings and objects. It also analyses how this attachment can impact on personal well-being. Understanding this is important in assessing the care people of all ages need and how this care should be delivered.

The Peripheral Auditory System - MIT

In this course, experimental approaches to the study of hearing and deafness are presented through lectures, laboratory exercises and discussions of the primary literature on the auditory periphery. Topics include inner-ear development, functional anatomy of the inner ear, cochlear mechanics and micromechanics, mechano-electric transduction by hair cells, outer hair cells' electromotility and the cochlear amplifier, otoacoustic emissions, synaptic transmission, stimulus coding in auditory nerve responses, efferent control of cochlear function, damage and repair of hair-cell organs, and sensorineural hearing loss.

The Peripheral Auditory System - MIT

In this course, experimental approaches to the study of hearing and deafness are presented through lectures, laboratory exercises and discussions of the primary literature on the auditory periphery. Topics include inner-ear development, functional anatomy of the inner ear, cochlear mechanics and micromechanics, mechano-electric transduction by hair cells, outer hair cells' electromotility and the cochlear amplifier, otoacoustic emissions, synaptic transmission, stimulus coding in auditory nerve responses, efferent control of cochlear function, damage and repair of hair-cell organs, and sensorineural hearing loss.

Training Methods and Continuing Education for Health Workers - Johns Hopkins

This course in Training Methods and Continuing Education for Health Workers identifies the role of training and continuing education as an important component of health service and personnel management. Participants will be guided through the steps of planning training and continuing education activities for a range of health workers from managers to village volunteers. The course draws on real life examples from community-directed onchocerciasis control, village health worker programs, and patent medicine vendor training programs, to name a few.

Tropical Environmental Health - Johns Hopkins

Inadequate water supplies and lack of sanitation facilities represent major hazards to the public health in many parts of the world. In spite of the International Water Supply Decade, (1980-1990) there are more people without facilities approaching minimum standards now than existed at the beginning of the program. Without improvements in these areas, there can be no hope that there will be an overall improvement in the health of the nations which constitute the Third World. Yet appropriate technologies do exist which can go a long way to ameliorate these problems. You should end with a good idea about how these tings work and how they can be maintained.

Tumor Pathophysiology and Transport Phenomena - MIT

Tumor pathophysiology plays a central role in the growth, invasion, metastasis and treatment of solid tumors. This class applies principles of transport phenomena to develop a systems-level, quantitative understanding of angiogenesis, blood flow and microcirculation, metabolism and microenvironment, transport and binding of small and large molecules, movement of cancer and immune cells, metastatic process, and treatment response.

Understanding Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Health Care - Johns Hopkins

The primary objective of this content is to prepare students to read and interpret cost-effectiveness studies. The students will first be introduced to basic economic concepts that are needed in order to understand the recommendations from the United States Panel on Cost Effectiveness in Health and Medicine. One example is the distinction between opportunity costs and budgetary costs. The recommendations will then be reviewed, particularly as they apply to what students should expect to read in cost-effectiveness research reports.

Understanding health – taster materials - The Open University

Alcohol abuse, healthy living and Alzheimer's disease all regularly hit the headlines. This unit will take a brief look at these issues and introduces you to the type of issues that you would be asked to examine should you wish to study OU course Y158 Understanding Health.

Water and Sanitation Needs in Complex Human Emergencies - Johns Hopkins

Presents a historical overview of the influence of water and sanitation on human health; types of water and sanitation facilities and equipment presently available and particularly suited to refugee populations displaced by war, famine, drought, and economic turmoil; and methodologies for assessing and quantifying water and sanitation needs.

Web 2.0: Risks for STI/HIV – Opportunities and Prevention - Johns Hopkins

This lecture explores the risks and prevention opportunities presented by the emergence of social networking and internet dating sites. Presented by the Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health.

What's in a title: understanding meanings in community care - The Open University

What do we mean by 'community', 'care' and 'welfare'? In this unit you will explore the meanings of these words in their historical and cultural settings. The unit does not discuss these terms exclusively in terms of social work practice so service users, carers or anyone interested in community care and the ways in which welfare services are provided would find this unit useful.

Working Together for Children: Stirling - The Open Unviversity

The care of children, especially those with disabilities, is surrounded by complex issues. Learning to navigate these difficulties while helping children to lead a happy and fulfilling life is the focus of this unit. Video footage from the Plus organisation in Stirling, Scotland, will help you develop a skilled, dynamic and ethical approach to working with children.

Young People's Wellbeing - The Open University

What do we mean by 'wellbeing' for young people? How is it shaped by social differences and inequalities, and how can we improve young people's mental and physical health? This unit will examine the range of factors affecting young people's wellbeing, such as obesity, binge drinking, depression and behavioural problems.

Zoological Medicine - Tufts University

The core curriculum in Zoological Medicine at Tufts is presented in two separate, but continuous courses: Introduction to Zoological Medicine and Zoological Medicine. Zoological medicine has recently been adopted as a universal term to be applied to all non-traditional species, including wildlife, zoo species, companion exotic animals, pet birds, marine mammals, and fish.

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